Bobbing Around Volume 19 Number 2

We’re killing all complex life on Earth. It’s official: we are in the sixth great extinction event, the next one after the dinosaurs departed… All the problems are due to greed, aggression, fear, envy, hate. If you exercise metta [unconditional love for all living beings], you won’t be doing things that way, and then we’ll be able to deal with the problems facing us.
Bill Sutcliffe


The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second-best time is now.
Chinese proverb.


Antarctica lost as much sea ice in four years as the Arctic lost in 34 years


Bobbing Around

Volume Nineteen, Number Two,
August, 2019

Bob Rich’s rave

email

bobswriting.com    anxietyanddepression-help.com/    mudsmith.net/    previous issues

*About Bobbing Around
subscribe/unsubscribe
guidelines for contributions

Comments are welcome — on the bottom of every post and page here, including this one.

*From me to you
Interview on the Authors Show
Radio interview at As We Get Older
And the winner is…
For my new friends since 2017
New email card
Naming advice, please

*New stuff

*Blog posts during July


I am responsible for anything I have written. However, where I reproduce contributions from other people, I do not necessarily endorse their opinions. I may or may not agree with them, but give them the courtesy of a forum.


There are so many important issues demanding our attention right now. But I fail to see how any of them will matter without a planet to live on.
Robert Redford


The world now stands on the edge of the abyss facing two existential threats, runaway climate change and nuclear war. These are the flip sides to the same coin: industrialisation.
Kevin Lester, in World in Chains, edited by Angie Zelter
This book is full of many other quotable quotes. Though published in 2014, that only affects the examples it uses. The logic is even more relevant now than it was then.


The scientific consensus that humans are causing global warming is likely to have passed 99% [of CLIMATE scientists].
Jonathan Watts


Bobbing Around is COPYRIGHTED. No part of it may be reproduced in any form, at any venue, without the express permission of the publisher (ME!) and the author if that is another person.


From me to you

Interview on the Authors Show
Radio interview at As We Get Older
And the winner is…
For my new friends since 2017
New email card
Naming advice, please

 

Interview on the Authors Show


The Authors Show specialises in large numbers of 15 minute interviews with authors. I organised one in order to publicise From Depression to Contentment, and it was an excellent learning experience.

My friends all know about this book. If I want to be of service, I need to reach out to people who would benefit from following its program — but first they need to hear about it.

Unfortunately, this podcast is not it. I had my interview, and it was accessible for 24 hours. I told about it to everyone I could think of — which is you — those friends who already know about the book.

The show itself publicised it on Facebook and Twitter and such, as one of perhaps 40 interviews that day, replaced by 40 the next day, on and on. If I invested $US198, I could have bought a copy of the recording — accessible permanently to my friends. Duh.

For $US300, I could have one day a month for six months, and the price goes up…

My country’s exchange rate is ridiculously low, so that $300 is more like $480 for me. Not on.

The process was interesting. The interviewer emailed me 7 questions I gave in-depth answers to (in the event, he hadn’t read them before the interview!), and asked me to specify 5 to 10 questions he could ask. What I have done is to reproduce those 10 questions, and my planned answers, in a post. So, you can still read what I had to say.

Enjoy.


Radio interview at As We Get Older

I’ve had the pleasure of a chat with Bob Pessemier, who has a colourful and interesting history. He is doing a public service with his podcasts, reviews and essays. He runs As We Get Older, which is a blog for men who are past the first blush of youth. 🙂 That’s defined as over 35, which to me is barely out of teenage, but well…

He interviewed me on Wednesday, 24th July, and now he is editing our conversation. When he is ready, he’ll email me a link, and you can listen in.

Unlike the Authors Show interview, this was really a conversation, rather than a high-pressure trial. Instead of having to squeeze everything I needed to say into 15 minutes, the podcast is an hour, and hopefully entertaining and informative enough to justify taking up such a big proportion of your life.

You can check out other podcasts at As We Get Older.


And the winner is…

It’s not too late to read and enjoy my interview of Melanie Robertson-King, but it is too late for participating in the draw for winning one of her books.

This is to announce that the winner is Marie Lavender. Congratulations, Marie, and when you have read Melanie’s book, you are welcome to email the review to me, for publication in Bobbing Around.

For my new friends since 2017

So many new people have started to follow Bobbing Around that I’ve decided to introduce myself, all over again. In 2017, I was busily generating advance publicity for Hit and Run. As part of this, I was guest author for 2 hours on a Facebook readers’ group run by Melissa Storm.

After the event, I reproduced my part in the discussions between me and some thousands of lovely people, many of whom are still followers or subscribers.

Hit and Run is published, so I no longer give away advance review copies, but otherwise everything is still as good as new. And the book has a great cover, thanks to Martine Jardin.


New email card

People who have read my From Depression to Contentment know that part of positive psychology is to do things that make other people feel good. The more you give, the more you grow.

One of my little habits is to attach a card to emails with a nice picture, and words with the intention of benefiting the other person.

Here is the 11th such card:

It is the Andromeda Galaxy, with my favourite blessing. You’re welcome to use it, but making up your own is even more powerful. Only, do respect copyright when selecting a picture. I have learned how to do it from TA Sullivan. She had a post at BookDaily, which, I just found out, has disappeared off the web, so, I’ll repeat what she’d taught me. When searching for images on Google, click on “Tools” at the top. A new row of links appears. Click on “Usage rights,” then “Labeled for reuse.” These are public domain pics you are allowed to use.


Naming advice, please

Angela Archer has been kind enough to beta read the second volume of my Doom Healer series, You Can’t Escape Destiny, and has pointed out that there is a potential for confusion because too many major characters have a name starting with G.

She is right. A boy named Hilary Grattan insists on being called Grater. Bill Sutcliffe’s sister is Geraldine, though she prefers Gree. And Dr Eugene Miller is usually referred to as Gene.

“Grater” is not negotiable. Can you please suggest suitable names for the other two?

One thing: Little sister’s name needs to be multi-syllable, with a somewhat different-sounding abbreviation, and it should have a distinctly different pronunciation in French, e.g., have a silent end letter like t, s or r.

Here is a reward: You can be an admirable character within the series (first and last name) if I accept your two suggestions. 🙂



New stuff

Responses
John Rosenman

Environment
3 new studies: Global heating is real, and we are to blame

Good news
Killer Big Oil is closer to being sued

Psychology
Sad and grumpy
The Effects Death, Traumas And Disasters Have On Mental Health
“Grandsons” doing well

Technology
Leather from pineapple leaves
5 Eco-Friendly Alternatives to Using Appliances in the Home, by Emily Porter

Look over a writer’s shoulder
How not to self-publish

I approve of these announcements
Plan on how to save a (near) future
Welcome to MY festival
Bill Parker’s new book

Reviews
From Depression to Contentment, reviewed by Dipa Sanatani
The Old Testament Case for Nonviolence by Matthew Fleischer
David Savakerrva Book 1 by Lawrence Brown
No one is too small to make a difference, by Greta Thunberg

Fun
The dunny prayer
Heroic revolutionaries
John’s defence


Responses

John Rosenman

Hi, Bob,
Congratulations on entering your 19th year with your newsletter! It’s an excellent one, and my comments won’t be exhaustive. I imagine I’ll continue to read it, and I may send you additional comments.

First, thanks for your post on “Campaigning for Survival”. Yes, twelve years may be all we have. An extinction event or global disaster might be right around the corner. Fairly recently, I posted my views about Climate Change on Facebook, and a fellow writer took the opposing view. We sparred and sparred, he snagged articles from online that supported his view and I did the same. Finally, he said that we could do this all day and we should just agree to disagree. I agreed and ever since then I wish I hadn’t, or at least had presented one last argument. Why? Because he said that he believed the Earth was simply in the middle of the sun’s 14 million year cycle or something like that. In other words, global warming was simply a cyclical manifestation of the Earth’s patterns. I wish I had said, “Sure, let’s end this friendly exchange, but before we do, I’d like to point out that in my opinion, we don’t have 14 million years or even 100 years to act. Indeed, It’s my belief that we may have no more than 10 or 20 years to avoid irreversible damage to our biosphere. If you’re right, a million years from now, conditions will be pretty much the same. If I’m right, in a century or so the human race may be completely gone.

Alas, I didn’t say that.

Second, re “Gawain” a collaborative project inspired by your wife’s dream. Yes, I want to read on. As it is, you stop at a real cliffhanger. The first paragraph, though, causes me a little problem. The first sentence lacks the preposition “of” at a key place. Perhaps it’s no more than that.

Third, I like the three letters you write to those with emotional problems: a woman in her 60s with an abusive husband; a 22-year-old who has been sexually abused; and a man with anger management issues. I like your advice, which provides a course of treatment or at least a place to begin. I do wonder a bit about the 22-year-old, though. If her father was one of the men who abused her, why does she find that the company of older men is pleasant?

Hope things are going well with you and your writing. At present, I’m setting up two book-signings at local stores.

John

John Rosenman is a fine writer. You can check out my recent review of one of his books.


Environment

3 new studies: Global heating is real, and we are to blame

I’ve known this for decades, and am on top of the evidence, but keep coming across people who choose disagree. If you are serious about wanting to understand climate change, read the following three academic papers:

Neukom et al. in Nature.

Brönniman et al. in Nature Geoscience.

The extraordinary rate of the industrial-era temperature increase is evident on timescales longer than approximately 20 years:
PAGES 2K network in Nature Geosciences.

If you are not used to reading academese, Jonathan Watts has provided a plain-language summary of the studies and their implications.


Good news

Killer Big Oil is closer to being sued

The state of Rhode Island is suing the big oil companies for being the causes of the climate emergency that has caused huge damage in that state. Defence strategy has been to move to a Federal court, where they’d have a better chance of escaping responsibility.

A Federal judge has ruled that no, they need to face the music in Rhode Island, under state law.

The article notes that Big Tobacco was successfully sued in the same way, through state jurisdictions.

Thank you, Judge William Smith. His summation was spot on. Greta Thunberg will be proud of him, and what could be bigger praise?


Psychology

Sad and grumpy
The Effects Death, Traumas And Disasters Have On Mental Health
“Grandsons” doing well

 

Sad and grumpy

In young people, being irritable is one of the recognised symptoms of depression. Sam Keller has written an excellent, well documented essay to demonstrate that older people can also react to ongoing low mood, meaninglessness and self-hate with aggressiveness.

Well worth reading if you often act like this — or if you are on the receiving end from someone who does. (In that case, compassion will probably work better than hitting back.)


The Effects Death, Traumas And Disasters Have On Mental Health

A group of schoolkids researching mental health sent me this link for the contacts page on my psychology site. In our crazy world, the relevant information is of general interest.


“Grandsons” doing well

Last October, a young man contacted me, because he was suicidal. As a teenager, he had sexually molested younger children, and now he was eaten by guilt and shame. We exchanged a few emails, and the contact stopped, as it usually does once the issue is reasonably resolved.

He has just sent me a catch-up email. Here is an extract:

    In October, I almost committed suicide over this matter — but instead chose to try a path of self-forgiveness and to devote the rest of my life to helping other people and animals. I’ve volunteered in the past, but my busy schedule with two jobs makes this hard; my part time job is at least helping seniors. In my spare time, I do try to help others online who are desperate for help and going through their own issues. I think those who commit suicide often struggle to forgive themselves for their own past actions, and I want to help others know that self-forgiveness is in fact possible — even if I have yet to entirely achieve it for myself (nonetheless, I’ve made a lot of progress).

    I did tell my past behavior to my significant other just last night and how I’ve struggled with guilt all these years. For all I knew, she could have decided to leave me, but instead, her reaction was one of compassion and understanding — which kind of surprised me. Had I forgiven myself completely already, I probably would not have brought this up with her, but rather, it was making me feel like I was hiding from her/didn’t deserve her love.

    In June, I traveled to another city and saw a random sign on the side of a road that said something like, “Hang in there. Your mistakes aren’t you.” I’m not sure if this was a message intended for me from above or anything, but I at least think that phrase is true. Sure, I made the mistakes and learned from them, but I am no longer that person or that wrong thing I did so long ago. I am worthy of love and happiness and I know that, and I’m closer to self-forgiveness.

Part of my answer was: “John, you are doing well. There are no coincidences: indeed that roadside sign was meant for you.

“Your analysis of your situation is exactly correct. Please read (or re-read) my page on self-assessed abusers.

“One of my cliches is: We are all apprentice Buddhas. You are on the way of spiritual growth, and this unfortunate period in your childhood has resulted in huge growth for you. So, you can celebrate your reaction, while deploring the original mistake.”

As I wrote to “John,” there is no such thing as a coincidence. By this coincidence that isn’t, I received this from another fine young man who had originally posted a suicidal cry for help at Queendom, and has been in regular contact with me:

    Dear Bob,

    Thank you for giving your time to help me get to where I am now. There were some rough spots here and there but I always listened and took everything you said into consideration and I’m glad I did. I truly appreciate all the kindness, patience and care you have shown me in the past months and I will always be grateful for what you have done for me and helped me with. I continue to use the lessons and many other tips and tricks you have taught me. Thanks for helping me go from an anxious mess that couldn’t sleep to a more confident person. Again, I appreciate everything and thank you for all of it and I will always remember you and everything you have helped me with and taught me.

Being a Professional Grandfather is a wonderful privilege.


Technology

Leather from pineapple leaves
5 Eco-Friendly Alternatives to Using Appliances in the Home, by Emily Porter

 

Leather from pineapple leaves

Honestly. What will they think of next?
This company manufactures an environmentally responsible replacement for plastic and leather. At this stage, it’ more expensive than I could use, but…


5 Eco-Friendly Alternatives to Using Appliances in the Home, by Emily Porter

Home appliances offer lots of convenience, but they can also use lots of electricity and increase waste. Although it may be hard to imagine life without some of your favorite appliances, there are actually quite a few options that will allow you to get things done without relying on electricity. Not only will these alternatives help you save money on your next utility bill, they’ll allow you to be more prepared in the event of an emergency or disaster.

Keep reading for five eco-friendly alternatives to using appliances in your home.

1. Hand-Wash Dishes

If you have a dishwasher in your home, you’ve probably gotten pretty used to relying on it. However, washing your dishes by hand is another great option and will allow you to scrub areas that are especially greasy and full of food. If you’re not ready to give up using your dishwasher just yet, you can still take a step in the right direction by turning off the heat dry setting on your machine and drying your dishes by hand.

[Bob: Our house in Healesville came with a built-in dishwasher. We ripped it out and sold it, and use the biological method Emily advocates. And the essay she references is lovely. Please read it.]

2. Air Dry Your Laundry

Letting your wet clothes tumble around in the dryer may be the quickest way to get them dry, but it isn’t the most energy efficient. Since dryers can take up a lot of energy, consider air drying your clothes outside on a clothesline or drying rack. Not only is this method good for the environment, but it also has lots of other benefits and is much gentler on your clothes.

[Bob: On rainy days and in winter, we have a folding clothes rack. I also stretched curtain wire along a sun-facing window, and we hang shirts and things there.]

3. Open Your Windows

Running the air conditioning on full blast is a quick and easy way to stay cool in the summer months — but it certainly isn’t the only way. Opening windows throughout your home can create a cross breeze that can keep you cool and by opening windows on opposite sides of your home, you can create a funnel effect that will move air through your home.

[Bob: There are more hints on temperature control here.]

4. Use a Portable Cooler for Your Food and Drinks

Your portable cooler can come in handy for more than just trips to the beach. In fact, a cooler full of ice can keep your food and drinks cool for hours, if necessary. To cool your items quickly, fill the cooler with ice cubes. However, if you’re looking to keep your food cold for longer, you should use a block of ice which can last in your cooler for up to a week. Extra insulation around the outside of the cooler will prolong its effectiveness.

5. Use an Open Flame to Prepare Food

Stoves are great, but you may not always be able to use one. If you ever find yourself in an emergency situation, it’ll be good to know how to prepare food in other ways. Cooking over an open flame is a great way to prepare food quickly and efficiently. If your home has a wood burning fireplace, this area can be used as a place to prepare food. However, when cooking over fire, it’s important to avoid foods with a lot of grease as this can present a fire hazard by causing the flames to grow.

There’s nothing wrong with enjoying the comforts that appliances offer, but it’s always good to know what to do in case you don’t have access to them. With the help of the tips above, you’ll be one step closer to living a sustainable lifestyle.

[Bob: Thank you, Emily. My wife and I have been doing most of these things for decades, and it’s good to be reminded that not everyone is aware of old fashioned ways of living.]

Emily Porter is an Editor from House Method who is passionate about safety and sustainability in the home.


Look over a writer’s shoulder

How not to self-publish

Susan Stewart has written an excellent instructional article on the pitfalls to avoid. She is a professional book designer, and knows her stuff.


I approve of these announcements

Plan on how to save a (near) future
Welcome to MY festival
Bill Parker’s new book

 

Plan on how to save a (near) future

The unsolved problem for the entire environmental-progressive movement is:

How do we go beyond our own thought bubbles?

How do we communicate with people who do not ordinarily seek out books, videos and talks about transformative social change?

The Great Transition initiative is a platform for solving this problem. Our idea is to engage the members of as many groups as possible as citizen-educators,/ thought catalysts and provide tools to make communicating as easy as possible.

Zoom meetings

Our regular Zoom meeting to kick around ideas and get caught up on what each other is doing is Wednesday mornings, 9 AM Sydney time. I look forward to seeing you there!


Welcome to MY festival

I don’t recommend flying to Australia specially to do so, but if you are within reasonable distance of Healesville, Victoria in November, I’d love you to attend.

The EarthArtBeat Festival will be at my community, Moora Moora, NOV 8-10th 2019.

EarthArtBeat Festival is a special biennial event, presented by Earthheart Foundation at Moora Moora Community in the Yarra Valley, VIC. It is a non-for-profit, off grid, solar powered, family friendly, camp out.

EarthArtbeat is a celebratory, transformational and healing event, intended to connect people and place, while deepening the soul of community.


Bill Parker’s new book


…is now on Audible, on Amazon and the Apple iTunes store.

It is Revolution, the 5th volume of his Five Moons series.

    But the Five Moons was more than just a starship. It was the nexus of fates, and it seemed to have a mind of its own. As I think about it now, the Five Moons had chosen me for my indomitable spirit. The Five Moons had chosen Dallas Blake for his warrior’s spirit. The Five Moons had chosen each member of the crew for a reason, and it was not done yet. There was one more. The Five Moons last choice could blow this whole thing wide open.


Reviews

From Depression to Contentment, reviewed by Dipa Sanatani
The Old Testament Case for Nonviolence by Matthew Fleischer
David Savakerrva Book 1 by Lawrence Brown
No one is too small to make a difference, by Greta Thunberg
The Little Light by Dipa Sanatani

 

From Depression to Contentment, reviewed by Dipa Sanatani

Depression can take a crippling toll on the human psyche. In Harry Potter, JK Rowling drew on her experiences with depression to portray Dementors: dark-cloaked beings that drain peace, hope and happiness. As a former junior high school teacher, I’ve encountered first-hand the effect that depression has on teenagers and those who care for them.

In Dr Bob Rich’s From Depression to Contentment, he reveals how you can beat depression in a very balanced way. Although his experience and background in academia is evident in the skilful way he tackles the topic, the program that he outlines in this book is easy to understand and would offer solace to anyone suffering with depression; as well as anyone who knows someone that suffers from depression. As you read this book, you will find stories about others who’ve been there and made their way out of the long dark tunnel and into the light. Having been through it himself, the author even offers us his own experiences about how he recovered from depression.

In addition, Dr Rich draws on philosophies from a variety of world religions to express and ground some of his ideas. I believe this to be incredibly valuable as many people who suffer from depression do turn to their faith to provide answers when they can find them nowhere else. His chapters on Relaxation and Meditation as well as Spiritual Care would be enlightening for those looking for deeper answers within themselves.

Overall, this book is a relatable and practical guide to healing from those dark-cloaked Dementors that drain peace, hope and happiness.

Dipa Sanatani is the author of The Little Light. She’s lived, studied and worked in Singapore, Australia, Israel, Japan and China. With a background in both business and education, Dipa has extensive experience in the public-school system as well as in the private, government and corporate sectors.


The Old Testament Case for Nonviolence by Matthew Fleischer

While this is a completely new area of study for me, I find the author drawing on a long and fruitful scholarly tradition exploring the role of violence in the Bible.

The first approach is to take account of the cultures of the time, comparing Israelites’ moral code with those of other nations. This makes sense. Here is one example (p 40) regarding the justification for war. “The basic logic goes like this: To exist as a theocratic nation, Israel needed land. To gain and control land, Israel needed to use violence. Today, however, God calls us to exist as a church, not a theocratic nation. Therefore, because we don’t need to acquire or control land, we don’t need to use (and no longer have an excuse for using) violence… what was once productive is now counterproductive.”

An extended, powerful analysis of nationalism should be read by all politicians, particularly those who misuse the Bible as a justification for repression and conflict. Jesus explicitly challenged and rejected nationalism. We are all “neighbours,” you know, the people we are supposed to love: “Any type of Christian nationalism today is ethical backsliding. It reverses what Jesus accomplished by reintroducing ethnic and political membership criteria… by turning neighbors back into enemies” (p 36).

Another, related line of reasoning is that lessons are progressive. A toddler is forbidden from playing with matches. Later, the child is taught how to use them safely, and then they become a tool. Laws one is given must be appropriate to one’s stage of development, and this goes for moral considerations such as war and violence. “They wouldn’t have even thought of the moral questions we ask today, because they wouldn’t have made sense to them” (p 77).

I won’t give a synopsis of this interesting and challenging book. If you want to understand the reason for the injunctions against violence from Jesus (and the Buddha and other figures at that level of development), you can’t do better than to read it.

Matthew Curtis Fleischer is a reader, writer, and attorney with a passion for exploring God’s beauty and brilliance. He lives in Oklahoma City with his fantabulous bride and their three superduper children. You can find out more about him and follow him on Facebook or Twitter @MatthewCurtisF.


David Savakerrva Book 1 by Lawrence Brown

I was offered a free copy of this book, in exchange for an honest review. The first chapter had brilliant reality building and characterisation, so I accepted. Both these wonderful aspects continued to the end of this volume, but all the same, if I’d known the horror within the pages, I’d have declined. Our world out there is full enough of horror, so I avoid it when I want entertainment.

All the same, many people enjoy reading horror, I can’t imagine why. If you do, you’ll find this story great value. Action is unremitting, and there is humor behind the nasty events befalling our protagonist, and pretty well everyone else.

The theme is the antihero: a boy who is always on the outer, failing at everything he tries, but who is pushed by circumstances into becoming the savior of a people he has no emotional connection with. It is not until the very last scene that he starts to gain the qualities a hero needs.

The plot is ingenious, the fantasy reality compelling — but too horrible for my liking. Your taste may differ from mine, in which case, check this book out.

The book is available for free on Amazon August 1 and 2, and the author would love you to grab a copy to raise his ranking.


No one is too small to make a difference, by Greta Thunberg

I love this little girl. I’d have her as President of Earth if I could. For me, she is on the same level as two old men I love: the Dalai Lama, and Pope Francis.

This tiny book is an extract of quotes from her many public appearances. As such, there is considerable repetition: naturally, one tends to use the same words when facing a succession of audiences. However, this doesn’t detract from the message, which is inspiring, 200% scientifically accurate, and is a call to action all of us must follow.

I have a friend who has bought many copies, to give away to people. He didn’t need to give me one: I’ve already bought it, if for no other reason than to support this wonderful young lady.


The Little Light by Dipa Sanatani


This is perhaps the most delightful book I have ever read. It is not a novel, but… Fairy tale? Allegory? Myth? The closest to it is the myths of the Greek gods, but Dipa’s pantheon is free of the savagery.

We are introduced to superior beings who enter one at a time, and meet Little Light, who is a person on the way to being born. Only, these god-figures are all too human, and carry on jut like any extended family on earth. I was surprised by some of the identities. For example, Jupiter is female, the daughter of Venus and Saturn, but hey, it’s Dipa’s pantheon, not mine.

In a way, the entire book is a prologue, in that it ends at a birth, presaged to lead to great things. I am looking forward to reading the life of the prophesized great person.


Fun

The dunny prayer
Heroic revolutionaries
John’s defence

 

The dunny prayer

For those lacking culture, a “dunny” is the repository of human wastes.

For many years, we’ve had the Dunny Prayer hanging on the wall in ours. It has become highly relevant, because my darling granddaughter in Sydney takes a book with her when she goes — then sits there, reading.

            Bless this room, oh lord we pray
            Make it sweet by night and day.
            Bless the seat and bless the flush
            Bless the early morning rush.
            Bless nasty little brat
            Who pulled the chain and drowned the cat.
            Bless the girls who lock the door
            Reading books an hour or more.
            Bless the phantom with the feet
            The prints of which are on the seat.
            Bless the fiend whose favourite caper
            Leaves you stranded with no paper.
            Finally, With love and kisses
            BLAST the bloody fool who misses.


Heroic revolutionaries

Donald Trump has proven that anyone can become US President. You don’t need to be intelligent, or anything else.

He told the world that in 1775 the American revolutionary forces took over the British airports. Good to know they had time machines.

I have the luxury of not living in Trumpistan. I simply cannot imagine how people can vote for this genius.


John’s defence

Your honour, I introduced myself, “Hi, I am John.” She said, “Pat,” so I did.


Petition to declare a climate emergency in Australia



Posts during July

ENVIRONMENT

Why do so many people still believe climate change is a myth?

Why have some US states banned plastic bags?

GOOD NEWS

Plant trees to save the world

Higher education declares a climate emergency

Monash University’s Net Zero Initiative

6 on board, 44 to go: US states aiming to be carbon-free

BHP knows about climate science

POLITICS

They dress the Devil in God’s clothes

Australia’s REAL opposition

INSPIRATION

Happy birthday, Dalai Lama

PSYCHOLOGY

Happiness vs. contentment

DEEPER ISSUES

Reducing suffering by one

LOOK OVER A WRITER’S SHOULDER

Writing fun, July 2019


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It is a FALSE RUMOUR that you need to buy one of my books before your submission is accepted. Not that I cry when someone does so.

Above all, contributions should be brief. I may shorten them if necessary.

Content should be non-discriminatory, polite and relevant. Announcements should be 100 to 200 words, shorter if possible. Book reviews, essays and stories should be at the very most 500 words, poems up to 30 lines.

Author bios should be about 50 words, and if possible include a web address.

About Dr Bob Rich

I am a professional grandfather. My main motivation is to transform society to create a sustainable world in which my grandchildren and their grandchildren in perpetuity can have a life, and a life worth living. This means reversing environmental idiocy that's now threatening us with extinction, and replacing culture of greed and conflict with one of compassion and cooperation.
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