Seasons

Seasons is what Rhobin would like us to write about in April. My immediate reaction was, “I don’t pay seasons much attention. At best, they are background.”

Only… quite some time ago, she wanted us to write about the weather. I’ve found that, since writing that post, the weather has received far more mention in my writing. Even when revising some old material, I found my characters commenting on it — though usually in a humorous or sarcastic way. So, I expect that thinking about this post will season my future writing.

I suspect that the further you live from the equator, the more the seasons influence your thinking, and therefore your writing. My location has four seasons (a joke is, every day, but that’s a comment about the weather), but the variation is slight by global standards. We can still grow vegetables and admire some flowers in winter, and get cold snaps in summer.

When I wrote about Hungary in my multiple award winning Anikó: The stranger who loved me, there was the snow and ice of winter, compared to pavement shimmering in the heat at the same time of the year in Australia.

But now, I need to put this post away, and reread my current work to see where the seasons can play a role. Trouble is, that story is on a planet that has no seasons: its axis of rotation has almost no inclination. And I am not inclined to upset billions of beings by rocking their planet around.


My partners in round-rhobining live in more variable climates than I do. Please visit them to see what they have to say about it:

Rhobin L Courtright
Skye Taylor
Victoria Chatham
Diane Bator
Judith Copek
Beverley Bateman
Connie Vines
Helena Fairfax

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About Dr Bob Rich

I am a professional grandfather. My main motivation is to transform society to create a sustainable world in which my grandchildren and their grandchildren in perpetuity can have a life, and a life worth living. This means reversing environmental idiocy that's now threatening us with extinction, and replacing culture of greed and conflict with one of compassion and cooperation.
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14 Responses to Seasons

  1. Connie Vines says:

    Dr. Bob, I’ve never thought about creating a planet for my characters–I’d probably get hung-up on fabric design and everyone would stave. Residing in Southern California, I experience 100 + in the summer and 60 degrees in autumn./winter. Spring is illusive–sunny one day and chilly and overcast the next.

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    • Dr Bob Rich says:

      Thank you for visiting, Connie.
      My characters live on Earth, on planets in faraway galaxies, in orbits around stars, and anywhere else it takes their fancy. It is not up to me to dictate to them. I am only the obedient scribe.
      🙂
      Bob

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  2. okwriter says:

    One climate all year on your planet – what an interesting concept. Are there not areas on our planet that basically have one season? I’m thinking the more tropical areas. Even there the season could still have an effect on the story or the characters, maybe the monotony affects the characters. Beverley

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    • Dr Bob Rich says:

      Beverley, I may not have been clear. There are no seasons, because the planet’s axis is tangential without an inclination. However, each area has its own climate: frigid near the poles, tropical on the equator.
      I don’t know why, I just write what I am told.
      🙂
      Bob

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  3. Dr Bob Rich says:

    Thank you, Rhobin.
    Being in the middle of an election campaign, when I wrote that post I felt less than inspired. So, I am surprised at the long list of “Likes” it has received.
    On the planet Magog, there are variations from year to year, and of course climatic zones equator to poles, but each area has the same season. I don’t know why, it’s just what the inhabitants have told me.
    But I am having fun with my “special children” subverting the culture of cruelty.
    🙂
    Bob

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  4. That’s such an interesting idea, Bob, about the planet that has no seasons. That in itself much surely have an effect on the characters. How would it be to live somewhere where the weather is the same day after day after day? I love the premise. Thanks for the interesting post.

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    • Dr Bob Rich says:

      Oh, the weather varies, but it’s the same the year around. The same hydrodynamic principles apply, with sea, land, mountains blocking prevailing winds, etc. But the locals have no conception of seasons. Because they have 12 legs, time is counted in twelvedays, and all 48 of them are much the same.
      Now look what you’ve done! I am supposed to be reviewing a nice lady’s book, not thinking about Magog.
      :))

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  5. I can’t imagine a place without seasons, even though these days in some places they seem to bleed into each other without us noticing. In Alberta, where I live in Canada, it’s cold and damp today, more like an English November. While in England, the bluebells are blooming. Oh, for a walk in those woods to experience their heady scent. I think I miss the variety of spring flowers here more than anything.

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    • Dr Bob Rich says:

      Of course, Canada and Britain focus you on seasons. Here, it’s officially autumn, but winter today. That’s good: no bushfires, and I don’t need to water the vegies and the roses.

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  6. Skye-writer says:

    Should have said, having lived in the South Pacific for two years, I very much understand your comment about the distance from the equator. While it was in the 90s in summer and 80s in the winter in daytime Tonga, and certain fruits (trees) were seasonal, there wasn’t a lot of difference. Not like living in New England where I grew up when it would be below freezing in daytime winter and well into the 80s in the summer. Not just different temperatures, but different landscapes – trees fleshed out with luxurious greenery, vs bare branches like lace on an ice blue sky.

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    • Dr Bob Rich says:

      Yes. When I was a boy in Hungary, seasons certainly seasoned life. Here, yesterday it was sunny and warm, today it’s drizzling and cold. Tomorrow we may be back to drought.
      🙂

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  7. Skye-writer says:

    One of the best things about this Round Robin blog for us authors is getting new ideas, new ways to looking at our own writing and new ways to enhance our stories.

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  8. Rhobin says:

    Interesting post, Dr. Bob, as usual. I must say, though, even a planet that has only one constant has a season, and any minor change would be very significant to the inhabitants. In one of my books I wrote about a planet that had undergone a thousand years of human induced bio-forming. The residents were afraid to leave their habitats and hated looking out any window even as their world approached a life-sustainable outdoors.

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