Bobbing Around Volume 14 Number 10

Bobbing Around

Volume Fourteen, Number Ten,
March, 2015

Bob Rich’s rave

email

bobswriting.com anxietyanddepression-help.com/ mudsmith.net/ previous issues

Metta: it’s unconditional, non-sexual, non-possessive, non-judgmental love. I love you just because you exist, regardless of what you’ve done or may do in the future.

*About Bobbing Around
subscribe/unsubscribe
guidelines for contributions

*From me to you
Education for Sustainable Development
A revision
Reblogged a must-read
Children in detention
Eric’s rants

*Responses to past issues
John Harland, in response to Matthew Wright
THE REEF CYCLE: Engaging in creativity and global awareness
from Dr. Elizabeth Tindle, FAPS

*Politics
Obama has declared war on Alaska!
An “Ike Republican” speaks out
Sri Lanka rejects gambling
Greens leader gets it right
Russell Brand on refugees
Monsanto shareholders attack
Uncoaling Britain

*Environment
Robert Redford: Fossil Fuels Need to Stay in the Ground
Racing to extinction: a movie to watch
Wisdom
More on the Antarctic
Huge Arctic ice cap on the move
More of these are being found
Renewable energy mythbusting

*Good news
Obama vetoes XL
Californian farmers store carbon in the soil
China cuts coal use
A Sydney council divests
Norway divesting
Girl lives for 2 years in New York, without generating garbage
Pope Francis leads on climate change
Australian aid cuts sexual violence in Solomon Islands

*Compassionate action
Decency lives in Serbia
88 year old doctor does medicine from the heart
Wonderful words from New Zealand
Heartwarming story about a boy
And 5 more wonderful kids
Random acts of kindness
One woman’s compassion for jailbirds pays off
1000 Muslims protect synagogue

*Technology
An app for compassion
The unsolvable problem for nuclear power
Small is beautiful: 2 kids build lovely but cheap
The outback handwash
World’s first wave energy project is online
Freedom from the grid?

*Deeper issues
An Open Letter To The Guys Who Run The World
What happened when I confronted my cruellest troll, by Lindy West
George Monbiot, voicing my chant
…and so does Richard Schiffman
How to live a meaningful life
Another valid argument for being childfree

*Psychology
A meditation, from Janis Silverman
Mental health, not mental illness
The wonderful joys of suffering schizophrenia

*Health
What Is a CSA and Why You Should Join One
Roald Dahl on vaccination
Young people with arthritis
Coal kills

*For writers
The mystery of -ing
Will Your Writing Be Remembered?

*What my friends want you to know
Avaaz battling methane
Refugee webinar a success
Jan Sikes wins award
Unsyrupy love poems
Renewable energy wiki
Buddhist retreat WITH technology
Become a climate reality leader
Greenpeace helps Kiribati
Protect whales from assault

*Reviews
Tales of the Symbiont Safety Patrol, by Samuel King
Ascending Spiral, reviewed by Paul Frampton
Ascending Spiral, reviewed by Theresa Crater
Tricked! The story of an internet scam, by Paul Frampton

*A bit of fun
A quiz


I am responsible for anything I have written. However, where I reproduce contributions from other people, I do not necessarily endorse their opinions. I may or may not agree with them, but give them the courtesy of a forum.


Bobbing Around is COPYRIGHTED. No part of it may be reproduced in any form, at any venue, without the express permission of the publisher (ME!) and the author if that is another person. You may forward the entire magazine to anyone else.


From me to you

Education for Sustainable Development
A revision
Reblogged a must-read
Children in detention
Eric’s rants

 

Education for Sustainable Development

I “pressed” this post by Sven because it very efficiently summarises all the symptoms of our crazy global culture. It sets out the problem with a huge number of references.

Anyone doubting that we need to change direction should have a read. You “don’t believe” in global warming? That’s all right. Use Sven’s links to read up on the other problems that seem plausible to you.

Education for Sustainable Development.


A revision

I have modified my conclusions in the essay But there is no need for despair.

You might want to check out the change.


Reblogged a must-read

I have posted a link to an interview Mike Stasse has reblogged. Dr Kerryn Higgs talks about her journey to writing her book Collision Course — Endless Growth On A Finite Planet. She is inspiring, informative and accurate.


Children in detention

In response to an article in the Guardian, a person made this comment:

“I have a real problem with the notion that parents with children should have free access to Australia as a destination for any persons of any nationality and for any reason.

My problem is that children become nothing more than passports for people to gain entry into Australia. This will i think restart the boat trade but involve only people with children.

What ever the answer is my deep concern is that we allow this money making venture to restart. There has to be a better way.”

My reply:

“I have a real problem that any person, of any age, is put in a concentration camp if arriving by boat.

Imagine:

You are a minority in your country, tortured, robbed, killed just because you are a Hazara, or a Christian, or a Tamil, whatever, depending on the country. You manage to get enough money together to leave, and find a future. “If we’re all going to die, we might as well die trying.”

You go through incredible hardship, are taken advantage of by a chain of criminals, and eventually are risking your life on a leaky ship.

THAT’s what being an asylum seeker is like.


Eric’ rants

Mike Stasse has reblogged a wonderful essay from “Eric’s rants and videos.” It is so exactly my view that I have also reblogged it.

This is a must-read.
eric

Responses to past issues

John Harland, in response to Matthew Wright
THE REEF CYCLE: Engaging in creativity and global awareness from Dr. Elizabeth Tindle, FAPS

 

John Harland, in response to Matthew Wright

Hi Bob

I see an exception to Matthew Wright’s condemnation of evaporative coolers.

In a taxi, using an air conditioner requires keeping the windows closed, but the first thing everyone wants to do when climbing in is to open the windows and they will not accept the received wisdom that the air conditioner will cool them better when the windows are closed.

Because it won’t. Air is highly insulative and has a low specific heat. If you’re warm when you move into an area with cool air, you cool down only very slowly. Far faster cooling comes from maintaining airflow and cooling the air only slightly.

If air conditioned workplaces had cooling areas with a lot of airflow, and possibly evaporative cooling — think of them as airlocks on a spaceship — people could cool down better before moving into the still, cooled air inside. Particularly important if you have been walking or cycling and have a lot of metabolic and solar heat to disperse.

In the case of the taxi, people — apart from the exasperated driver — are seldom in the enclosed space for long enough for the effect of the chilled, still. air to kick in. This time-inside concept might help us better to decide between air cooling and air movement in buildings.

So, when we require movement or constant opening and closing of doors, we need to look whether there is sufficient additional value in adding evaporative cooling.

We need to be wary of single solutions and blanket condemnations.

John Harland


THE REEF CYCLE: Engaging in creativity and global awareness
from Dr. Elizabeth Tindle, FAPS

Last issue, Elizabeth promised to report on her stage production. Here it is.

“An orgy of artistic splendour with an eco-warrior twist” Chris Hepperlin

The impact of the QUT Research Students’ Network Annual Art Exhibition and concert has grown. Is this our “Magnum Opus”? With a multicultural cast participating, this musical/ epic poetry performance met the stated goals of a 21st Century University education, namely preparing students for “a world of creativity and globalization” (Arun Sharma).

All the Arts of music, dance, poetry, drama, painting, singing and orchestra were represented and came together in the production of “The Reef Cycle” on 23rd November 2014. The show was advertised as Coral before Coal in a poster prepared by one of the talented Creative Industries graduates, Stephen Bennett, thereby preparing the audience for a musical with a strong environmental message.

The play opened with the sound of the sea and a scene set in the turquoise Coral Sea in the Pacific Ocean, with Tara, Goddess of the South Seas (Vanessa Van der Werff) and a young dance performer (Isabela Cremer, age 10) dancing under the undulating waves (represented by turquoise flimsy organza material rolling over the audience). The first words of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings opened the oration “The world has changed…”

The audience, together with the over thirty participants in the production, was invited to join in the singing of a vow to Australia “to care for soil and seas; to cherish air and animals, to save the plants and trees…” This was sung to the familiar tune of the Australian National Anthem (Advance Australia Fair).

The audience was then confronted by a group of dungaree wearing coal men with hard hats, picks and shovels, singing grim dark verses about their miserable unhealthy lives working with coal. Their rhymed verse was interspersed with sobs “Boo hoo; Boo hoo” and the audience was invited to join in with ‘crocodile tears’. Everyone boo-hooed.

The six coal men were led by Maria McCarthy who inspired the students’ acting and total immersion in the theatrical production. The coal men who later changed into ‘Grim Reapers’, six scythe wielding skeleton spectres who scared the younger members of the audience to real tears, provided a lighter side to the production. They sang heartily especially to the familiar tune of “Sixteen tons and what do I get?… I owe my soul to the [Galilee] coal” (Tennessee Ernie Ford).

The Earth Goddess Gaia (Tharanga Kariyawasam), dressed in forest green, gave a commendable performance, having to learn words, western poetry and expressions unfamiliar to her and to many in attendance. Such statements as “Fracking is for friggin’ fools; fracking breaks some basic rules; fracking jeopardises water. Cut it out! Do as you oughtta”. She also recited part of the poem “On Westminster Bridge” (William Wordsworth) substituting the beauty of the Great barrier Reef for the beauty of London, with great conviction.

Gaia and Tara confronted the potential destroyers of the reef Clivina (Imon Chowdhooree) and Propane (Miljenka Perovic), the “baddies”, and they all battled with sophistry, powerful arguments and threatening body language for their points of view. “To plunder is your stated goal; to rip from paradise its verdant soul…”
“We want money; we want loot. We want riches and don’t care a hoot about your reef or pristine coast…”

The performance was interspersed with some very relevant and entertaining songs, music and dance. The ‘Queen’, Freddie Mercury “I want to break free” dance performed by Imon Chowdhooree, wearing drag and a long blonde curly wig, was a great success and most amusing. He came on stage pushing his vacuum cleaner in a provocative pose whist the words on screen and music belted out in the “theatre” for all to join in. Imon caricatured cross dressers in Vaudeville in great style.

Our orchestra, led by Sam Zimmer entertained with their singing and playing. They sang “Salt water wells in my eyes…” (Julian Lennon) a very sad, touching song about the hole in the ozone layer and environmental damage. They also accompanied a talented staff member, Jan Harvey, whilst she rapped to Michael Jackson’s “Beat it” substituting “Dump it” for “Beat it”. This was followed immediately by a “flash mob” dance on stage with everyone participating having previously learned the Michael Jackson steps in rehearsal.

The performance was kept together by the Narrator (Kathleen Cremer) who summed up the story periodically in epic verse. “We need a new Noah to rescue the world; we need a new Noah with his wide sails unfurled…”

The play finished with the final words from Lord of the Rings (Tolkien), spoken by Gaia, Goddess of Earth, “On the slopes of Mount Doom they fought for the freedom of …EARTH”

The cast then held hands aloft and swayed to the tune of “Imagine” (John Lennon) sung and played by the music group. Everyone joined in and invited members of the audience to come on stage to join the players. This was a bonding experience: a true act of “engagement”. The camaraderie and team work was evident.
The technology support and sequencing of the programme was handled professionally by Anika McCarthy a 14 year old and the support by staff was overwhelming. This would not have been possible without the hard work and initiative of Christine Wang, Iris Cheng and a host of ISS (International Student Services) staff and their willing helpers.
We all enjoyed a well-earned meal at the end of the afternoon, organised by Pauline Soh.

The surrounds of the performance displayed the colourful canvases of students who had participated in the “Painting for the Planet” and “Rescuing the Reef” Art Workshops throughout the year. Some of the works of art were sold to support an environmental cause. What a splendid and appropriate venue in which to put on this production.

I feel honoured to have had the opportunity to work with so many beautiful authentic people and for us all to reach such amazing heights together in a complex creative exercise. I am sure everyone is proud of his /her achievements and that of such an engaged group.


Politics

Obama has declared war on Alaska!
An “Ike Republican” speaks out
Sri Lanka rejects gambling
Greens leader gets it right
Russell Brand on refugees

Monsanto shareholders attack
Uncoaling Britain

 

Obama has declared war on Alaska!

Or, so claim Republicans from that State. The reason is the wonderful decision to protect a great deal of irreplaceable wilderness from mineral exploitation, mostly for oil and gas, which, as we know, should be kept in the ground if we want anyone to survive.

Read what Kevin Matthews has to say about this.
alaskaoil


An “Ike Republican” speaks out

I’m an ‘Ike Republican’ who remembers the Grand Old Party of Dwight D. Eisenhower. But, frankly, I don’t recognize my party anymore. Today’s “Grand Old Party” (of Lincoln) is neither grand, old, or like Lincoln’s, because it favors privatizing our government. Historically, as defined by Benito Mussolini, that’s Fascism; the philosophy we fought against in World War 2. Eisenhower led the US and our allies to defeat it, and then he helped build our middle class.

Today I ask my Republican friends, “What part of ‘We The People’ don’t you understand?” Our Constitution’s first lines state clearly that our government exists to benefit all Americans, not just 1% of us. Privatization puts profiteers in control, and that’s not the America nor the Republican party I was born to.

President Obama’s policies resemble Dwight D. Eisenhower’s, who said: “A strong labor movement is an invigorating and necessary part of our industrial society”. Can anyone imagine today’s Republicans saying that?

Before Obama took office, George W. Bush bailed out the banks and Wall Street financiers with trillions of our tax dollars, so today we have the greatest disparity of wealth since the Great Depression. Instead of pointing fingers at a populist president, shouldn’t we be asking who in our government has made that happen? Who gave us two wars of choice after 9-11 increasing our deficit by almost a trillion dollars, then — after fingering Osama bin Laden as the mastermind — said, “I don’t know where bin Laden is. I have no idea and really don’t care. It’s not that important. It’s not our priority.”? (G.W. Bush, 3/13/02).

Nearly 800,000 US jobs were lost every month George W. Bush was in office and our military has stooped to torturing prisoners, violating the Geneva Convention. Today those wars have been added to our deficit and Republicans cynically blame Obama.

Since taking office, President Obama has eliminated bin Laden and weakened al Qaeda. We now have the fewest servicemen in war zones in 10 years. He supports our troops and veterans; something our current GOP ignores. Obama’s policies have produced 65 straight months of economic growth; unemployment is down from 10.1% (Oct. 2009) to 5.9%; stock markets have set new records; for 95% of us taxes are the lowest they’ve been in the last 50 years; oil imports have shrunk; gas prices are down; almost 10 million of us can now afford health insurance; the Affordable Care Act added life to Medicare; we have the slowest increase in healthcare costs since 1960; and more illegal immigrants are caught and deported than ever. Obama has also reduced spending and US debt.

Yes, there is more to do. Our infrastructure is still in disrepair and too many of us are steeped in debt. Yet all today’s GOP seems to want to do is to impeach Obama, kill “Obamacare” and weaken our government and its regulatory power while the wealthiest 1% reap more income than 45% of all U.S. wage-earners combined.

No one likes taxes, but the majority of us are paying our taxes while the “haves” don’t pay their fair share. Under Eisenhower the wealthy and corporations paid over 90% and everyone benefitted. No one likes borrowing money either, but when Eisenhower borrowed a trillion dollars it generated $2-3 trillion in our economy.

Eisenhower’s and Obama’s policies have been proven to work. If America is ever to return to its former greatness we should follow their formulas, and all polls suggest that most Americans agree. If Republicans follow Obama’s lead we can return wealth to the general economy and assure a brighter future for all Americans. But it can only happen if We The People demand it.

K.B. Kofoed is a writer who lives in Delaware County.


Sri Lanka rejects gambling

I was cheering when I read this article.
Sri Lanka’s previous government had offered lots of incentives to casinos. James Packer was one of those intending to invest. But there is now a new government, inspired by Buddhist principles — and all bets are off, literally.

WONDERFUL.

I hope they also practise the other Buddhist virtue of compassion when it comes to ethnic differences. It would be great if Singhalese and Tamil could live in harmony.
gambling

No one in the history of mankind has ever developed or operated a casino out of a burning desire to improve the lot of humanity.


Greens leader gets it right

christinemilne
This op-ed by Christine Milne, leader of the Australian Greens is about Australian politics, but her logic applies to the USA, Britain, Canada, and probably several other countries.

It points out the insanity of taking from the poor to make the over-wealthy wealthier. It specifies concrete, doable alternatives that are fair, and will work.


Russell Brand on refugees

I don’t own a TV, so I know nothing about Russell Brand. I came across this snippet, and love the guy.

He is outraged at Australia’s treatment of asylum seekers. A brilliant trick is to contrast them with Rupert Murdoch, and multinational corporations, who know no borders, and use certain countries to avoid paying tax. If they can go where they want to, why can’t poor people?

“Rupert Murdoch is a refugee of the world. Rupert Murdoch can be a refugee in the Virgin Islands, a refugee in Mauritius … and not pay tax in Britain and not pay tax in Australia and not pay tax in the United States, but actual refugees … they can’t get no traction, they can’t get no satisfaction or opportunities, for them the gates are closed.”

Russell Brand


Monsanto shareholders attack

One corporation has bullied, sued, and bought its way to an unprecedented monopoly over our food system, and a stranglehold on our democracies.

That corporation is Monsanto.

But in the last month, the SumOfUs community has hit Monsanto hard, and right on its doorstep. Together, we mounted an unprecedented shareholder rebellion at Monsanto’s most important meeting of the year, and left Monsanto reeling.

SumOfUs’ shareholder resolution at Monsanto was over one year in the making. It started with just two SumOfUs members and Monsanto shareholders, Grace and Keith, who bravely agreed to take a stand against Monsanto and challenge the way it does business. But the SumOfUs proposal ended with the support of almost 1 in 5 shareholders — an incredible internal rebellion given that big Wall Street firms usually support the corporate status quo.

And it was all possible because hundreds of thousands of us spoke up, and thousands of us chipped in, to make it happen:

Over 200,000 of us signed petitions, made phone calls and sent emails to our mutual funds about the shareholder proposal.

Over 153,000 of us helped build a crowd outside the Monsanto shareholder meeting.

And 32,000 of us voted for Monsanto as the Most Evil Corporation of 2014 — an award we presented at the shareholder meeting.
evilmonts


Uncoaling Britain

Hi Bob,

Did you hear that noise? That’s the sound of the climate breathing a small sigh of relief. Because just last week, some good news came through — UK political leaders announced they will put aside their differences and work together to phase out highly-polluting coal plants.

This new pact by David Cameron, Nick Clegg, and Ed Miliband is not only highly unusual in the run up to a general election, it also means that the UK is now the world’s first major economy to commit to end the age of climate-wrecking coal.

From Greenpeace


Environment

Robert Redford: Fossil Fuels Need to Stay in the Ground
Racing to extinction: a movie to watch
Wisdom
More on the Antarctic
Huge Arctic ice cap on the move
More of these are being found
Renewable energy mythbusting

 

Robert Redford: Fossil Fuels Need to Stay in the Ground

No more needs to be said. Just watch the video.
rredford


Racing to extinction: a movie to watch

Jane Goodall narrates this documentary, which shows what we are doing to the web of life we are a part of.
weboflife


Wisdom

tutu


More on the Antarctic

There is a deep water current around the Antarctic. It has been observed to have warmed significantly over the past 40 years, and no longer stays way down there. Its uprisings are lapping at the base of the ice.

Not good news.

Read an excellent plain-language description.


Huge Arctic ice cap on the move

The December 2014 issue of the Geophysical Research Letters has a report from Malcolm McMillan at al. on one of the largest ice caps north of Sweden. For the past 20 years, it has had a greatly accelerated thinning and melting. While they are cautious about assigning cause, in the typical scientific manner, the most likely is warmed waters in the Bering sea.

Now, I wonder how that water got warmed? Maybe we should get serious about using less energy…
meltice Photo: Jason Roberts, BBC


More of these are being found

blowhole
This is one of the faces of Arctic methane release.


Renewable energy mythbusting

The Australian Climate Council has prepared a succinct rebuttal to arguments against the “Renewable Energy Target.” While this is an Australian issue, the arguments apply globally.

It’ll only take a minute to read, so have a look, then share it, and support their work.

In case you don’t know, there was once a government instrumentality for the purpose of researching climate, and informing the population. The first action of the current government of dinosaurs was to abolish it, so the personnel formed an NGO, and continue their excellent work on donations.


Good news

Obama vetoes XL
Californian farmers store carbon in the soil
China cuts coal use
A Sydney council divests
Norway divesting
Girl lives for 2 years in New York, without generating garbage
Pope Francis leads on climate change
Australian aid cuts sexual violence in Solomon Islands

 

Obama vetoes XL

This is all over the news and the internet. President Obama has kept his word, and vetoed this project. This hasn’t sunk it yet — but it’s a great step.

Why?

Tar sands produce a bituminous oil that’s environmentally the worst to extract.

In terms of air pollution and carbon dioxide, it is the most damaging fuel, far worse than ordinary petroleum.

The pipeline has already caused personal damage to thousands of communities, and promises to extend it.

The USA is the country of its location, but its economic benefits to the USA will be very low.


Californian farmers store carbon in the soil

It’s old news that the best way to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide is to increase soil fertility. Now, California has started a program that rewards farmers for doing so.

Let’s hope they get some rain soon to make it possible on a large scale.
soilcarbon Image: Sydney University


China cuts coal use

Bad news for the thermal coal industry, which is good news for every living being on the planet: China’s use of thermal coal is declining faster than predicted.

In fact, a more recent report from S. E. Smith states that, for the first time in 100 years, China’s domestic coal production has fallen, and is not to be replaced by imports.


A Sydney council divests

Marrickville, an inner city council in Sydney, is moving its money out of fossil fuels because they want to do something about climate change.
streettrees


Norway divesting

Unlike other mineral-rich countries like Australia, Norway charged high for the privilege of allowing companies to mine its resources. The money was invested in citizens’ welfare, and the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund.

Now, that fund is divesting from oil, coal and various other minerals, because they are financially too risky.


Girl lives for 2 years in New York, without generating garbage

Well, she calls it trash of course.
laurensinger

Please visit her blog Trash is for Tossers and be inspired.


Pope Francis leads on climate change

Well, the heading says it all. The Vatican is setting up a major effort to lead humanity toward survival.


Australian aid cuts sexual violence in Solomon Islands

frida
Dear Bob,

Can you imagine living in a community where 3 out of every 5 women have experienced sexual or physical violence?

Frida Varon can. In Frida’s village in the Solomon Islands, family violence was an everyday occurrence.

But since Oxfam, with Australian aid funding, has been working Frida’s village, things have turned around:

“The violence from men is reducing. They are cutting down smoking and drinking beer. They’re not shouting, fighting and destroying property in their own houses… When I saw my husband’s new behaviour, I was very happy. I found that he has totally changed.”

We need your help to get the message out that Australian Aid works.

We know you know why Australian Aid is so important, Bob:

Australian Aid is helping to end family violence and violence against women and girls across the Pacific.

Together with other nations, Australian Aid has helped halve the number of children dying before they can reach their 5th birthday.

Australian Aid has helped increase access to clean water and seen an end to the Polio epidemic in the Pacific.

Oxfam is a proud supporter of the Campaign for Australian Aid, which is a joint initiative of the Make Poverty History and Micah Challenge coalitions, for all Australians who believe we can and should do more as a nation to end extreme poverty around the world.

Regards,

Grant Hill
International Development Campaign Lead
Oxfam Australia


Compassionate action

Decency lives in Serbia
88 year old doctor does medicine from the heart
Wonderful words from New Zealand
Heartwarming story about a boy
And 5 more wonderful kids
Random acts of kindness
One woman’s compassion for jailbirds pays off
1000 Muslims protect synagogue

 

Decency lives in Serbia

Serbs have a bad reputation for violence, intolerance and aggression. They are just people, like anyone else, anywhere else. And Sasha Pesic is better than many.
Watch this video of a wonderful rescue. Sasha and two other strangers went to endless trouble to save a dog, in a city with all too many dogs.
sashap


88 year old doctor does medicine from the heart

In a poverty-stricken American town, a doctor saves lives, and reduces suffering, without having a clinic of his own. He works out of his car, and will visit patients at home. If they can’t afford his minimal fee, he does his work for free.

The people of the town love him, but officialdom doesn’t. The Mississippi State Board of Medical Licensure has told him to stop his practice, and if he doesn’t, they may deregister him.

We need all people to be like this wonderful man.
landrum


Wonderful words from New Zealand

This little essay made my day, put peace in my heart and showed me that I am not alone.

Please spend the few seconds it’ll take you to read it.


Heartwarming story about a boy

A man has a hobby of photographing random New Yorkers. He asks a few questions from each. When he stopped a boy in the street, the result was inspiring. The boy ended up President Obama’s guest in the White House, and a slum school has funding for all sorts of great activities like trips to Harvard.

Read the story by Crystal Shepeard.
vidal


And 5 more wonderful kids

Read this inspiring story about 5 youngsters who are leading the culture change we need. Each in a different way, all of them have achieved the incredible because they felt compassion.
mayapenn
olivia


Random acts of kindness

I have started following Charles Benayon’s blog because he urges people to commit random acts of kindness. As all my friends know, that’s been in my email signature for years, it’s on my business cards, and is one thing I can thoroughly recommend to everyone.
free-hugs


One woman’s compassion for jailbirds pays off

This is an inspiring story of how one person can make a huge difference. This lady has turned the lives of thousands of people around.
darlenelewis


1000 Muslims protect synagogue

In this beautiful symbolic gesture, Muslims in Oslo, Norway, formed a ring around their city’s largest synagogue.
protect1

protect2

protect3 Photos: Muslim Public Affairs Council


Technology

An app for compassion
The unsolvable problem for nuclear power
Small is beautiful: 2 kids build lovely but cheap
The outback handwash
World’s first wave energy project is online
Freedom from the grid?

 

An app for compassion

Read about an invention by an 8-year-old girl. Its purpose: to encourage people to engage in acts of kindness.

This is culture change in action.
nyla


The unsolvable problem for nuclear power

…is radioactive waste. An article at EcoWatch again sets out the current state of dealing with it, which is “Duh… I dunno.”
nwaste


Small is beautiful: 2 kids build lovely but cheap

Two students in Iowa have built a lovely little dwelling for $489. Everything in the structure is stuff rescued from its way to landfill, or otherwise abandoned.

I am delighted: this is what my friends and I were doing 40 years ago.
littlehouse1

littlehouse2


The outback handwash

We haven’t had the terrible problems of California lately, but all the same, things are hot and water is short in my part of the world. We have a rainwater tank that collects water from about a quarter of the roof — but it’s only good when water occasionally falls from the sky. The tank water is plumbed to flush the toilet, water the garden and supply the laundry, including the washing machine. Bathroom and kitchen are off town water, which automatically replaces rainwater when the tank runs try.

We have got rid of the dishwasher that came with the house, and use the biological variety. The greasy water from washing has to go down the drain, but the rinsing can be in a bowl that can be tipped over plants once it’s cooled down. Similarly, much of our showering and handwashing water is saved, and used in the garden. And when the (highly water efficient) washing machine is pumping it out, it does so through a hose, again for garden watering.

All this is fairly commonplace, but I can help a little more. Do you know what the outback handwash is like?

1. Pick up soap.
2. Turn on tap; wet both hands and soap.
3. Turn tap off.
4. Work up a lather, properly washing hands, but keeping the tiny part between thumb and index finger of one hand free of lather.
5. Using that little bit of skin, turn on tap.
6. Rinse, and turn water off immediately.

This results in perhaps one-fifth of water use — about as much as a budgie would drink —
and of course, that water is still available for something else (no, no, not tonight’s soup!)


World’s first wave energy project is online

Perth, Western Australia, now has a device that generates both electricity and fresh water from wave action.
waveenergy


Freedom from the grid?

Here is an excellent discussion of the advantages and costs of a “hybrid” solar system: one that includes batteries, and is also connected to the grid.
hybridsolar


Deeper Issues

An Open Letter To The Guys Who Run The World
What happened when I confronted my cruellest troll, by Lindy West
George Monbiot, voicing my chant
…and so does Richard Schiffman
How to live a meaningful life
Another valid argument for being childfree

 

An Open Letter To The Guys Who Run The World

“Pope Buck” has written this wonderful letter you’ve got to read. It makes 1000% sense, and is in line with what I’ve been saying for years.

Mind you, it doesn’t quite go far enough, because it doesn’t call for a change of attitude, but is the necessary first step.


What happened when I confronted my cruellest troll
by Lindy West

lindywestLindy with her Dad, Paul.

This lady is a public personality, with feminist views, opposed to rape jokes, cruelty, misogyny. The result is a constant barrage of harassment from internet trolls.

Read the wonderful story of how her reaction to the worst one changed his life.


George Monbiot, voicing my chant

Readers of Bobbing Around know that I want to change from a culture of greed, competition and aggression to one of compassion, cooperation and decency. The change is possible, human nature being what it is: complex, with good and bad. We need to encourage, reward and validate the good.

George Monbiot argues that this change is the only one that will lead to a decent society.


…and so does Richard Schiffman

From a different starting point, this powerful essay arrives at the same destination.

Maybe it’s our time?


How to live a meaningful life

Myoshin Kelley has written about the role of meditation in improving life.

In Buddhist traditions, there are six qualities called the paramitas that with the support of mindfulness help us to discover a life of ease and peace. These six qualities are generosity, ethical conduct, patience, joyful effort, meditation and wisdom. When these qualities come together, they help us to be vitally alive.


Another valid argument for being childfree

I admire Pope Francis. I’ve agreed with almost all of his public pronouncements, but his latest one has disappointed me: he is urging people to have children. Well, that’s a little odd from someone who chose a childfree profession as a young man.

gabyhinsliff
Gaby Hinsliff, writing in the Guardian, has given a strong, reasoned rebuttal.

My comment to the article was, “The greatest benefit you can offer to the future generation is NOT to add to their numbers. We are now way beyond the carrying capacity of the planet, and millions are terribly suffering NOW because of that. This will only get worse. So, if you have a child, you are increasing the total sum of suffering for humanity at large, and bring a hopefully loved little person into a situation of future suffering.

“Does this make sense? If I were young now, I would choose to be childfree.”


Psychology

A meditation from Janis Silverman
Mental health, not mental illness
The wonderful joys of suffering schizophrenia

 

A meditation, from Janis Silverman

This is an extract from Janis’s Amazon Kindle book <a href=Relax, Reflect, Restore ad Recover: Guided Imagery Meditations for Women with Breast Cancer. Available in four digital and four audio books.

Her meditations will benefit you even if you don’t have breast cancer (or breasts).

Loving Memories

When you get down, worried, stressed, or lonely,
when you feel misunderstood or unloved,
just open your heart to others.
This is nearly impossible to do unless you feel loved.
Gently close your eyes.
Recall the happiest moments of your life, that feeling of pure joy.
Wrap yourself up in these warm memories and experiences.
If you have an object that reminds you of happy times,
Hold it in your hands.
Feel the experience, the smells the tastes.
Surround yourself in that joyful memory and place.
This object may be a seashell from a favorite beach.
Perhaps it is a pin or a necklace that belonged to a loved one or dear friend.
Bring to mind all those who you love and those who admire and adore you.
Feel their touch.
Hear their words.
Embrace yourself in their devotion and affection.
Slowly and gently bring yourself back to awareness and wakefulness.

Create a Treasure Box

Find a few favorite photos or objects that remind you of joyful moments.
Collect them and place them in a lovely box or container.
When you need to recall loving memories,
hold one of these comforting objects.

Recall Loving Memories

Sit, breathe slowly and remember.
Sense love filling your heart and your body.
When you are feeling loved and appreciated and
appreciative, you are ready to give love to others.
Share your love with others.
It is the best gift you can give.

Visit Janis Silverman’s web site.


Mental health, not mental illness

This essay by Anna Almendrala in the Huffington Post makes several valid points. Despite the high prevalence of mental disorders, many people fail to seek help, because of stigma. She lists 5 measures that should be implemented.

You may be amused to find out that the Australian Psychological Society’s College of Clinical Psychologists consider themselves to be experts in mental illness, while my mob, the College of Counselling Psychologists, say we are experts in mental health.


The wonderful joys of suffering schizophrenia

This essay from a loving father is a must-read. If you feel any fear of people with schizophrenia, or think of them with disdain, it’s especially important you read it.

Peter was a talented artist. Creativity often goes with “mental illness.” At 30 years of age, he suffered a major psychotic episode. After this, his parents were his carers, and all three grew from the experience.

I had tears in my eyes, reading Harry Leslie Smith’s account.

So, this item could just as well have been classified as “Compassionate action” or “Deeper issues.”


Health

What Is a CSA and Why You Should Join One
Roald Dahl on vaccination
Young people with arthritis
Coal kills

 

What Is a CSA and Why You Should Join One

My friend Luc Roland runs a CSA based at my community, Moora Moora. So, from personal experience, I can tell you that a CSA is good for your health.

You can read about them here.


Roald Dahl on vaccination

Roald Dahl lost his daughter Olivia to a disease that is now preventable.
vaccination


Young people with arthritis

There are about 200 different forms of arthritis, and some of them affect young children. If you, or someone you love, struggles with painful joints while others of the same age blithely do whatever they want to, then visit Arthur’s Place.


Coal kills

This is not some fanciful analogy, but well documented fact. The health bill of coal mining, storage and transport in one of Australia’s major coal areas is $600 million a year.


Writing

The mystery of -ing
Will Your Writing Be Remembered?

 

The mystery of -ing

Take a verb and put -ing on the end of it, and you have a mysterious thing called a gerund.

“The -ing form in the English language can function as a noun, verb, adjective or sometimes adverb”.

Sometimes, a gerund is a participle. But then again, sometimes it isn’t.

One thing a gerund never is. It’s never a verb, although it’s a modified verb.

Don’t you love English?

So, a sentence with a verbish-looking thing that has an -ing on the end of it is not grammatical, because it lacks a verb:

    He squashing a few ants.

We can fix this in two ways. First, of course, is to ungerundify the verb:

    He squashed a few ants.

Or, we can make this statement part of a longer sentence:

    He stood up, squashing a few ants.

This is fine, though not for the ants of course. Now, the bit with the ing in it is a subordinate clause that acts like an adverb (something that qualifies a verb). Also, while this is correct, these are both wrong:

    Standing up, squashing a few ants. (no verb)

    He stood up, squashed a few ants. (chained sentences)

However, we can vary the order and still be grammatical, and we can fix the chained sentence:

    Standing up, he squashed a few ants.

    He stood up, and squashed a few ants.

I feel very sorry for all those ants, but I’m hoping I’ve been of some help in getting rid of a common error I’m seeing in writing all the time.


Will Your Writing Be Remembered?

Sometimes you read a book, story or newspaper article that stays with you. You want to keep it and read it again, and each time you do so you find something new in it.

What distinguishes a memorable story from a forgettable one?
I think it has to do with philosophy.

Everything has a message. Everything we do, say — and therefore write — is based on our underlying system of beliefs. Sometimes the message is up front, as in a sermon, political propaganda or a sales presentation. But even the tritest pulp fiction, even the simplest children’s story, even the most banal announcement in the local paper has a message. It may go unrecognised by both author and reader, and yet it has its effects.

For example an advertisement for a travel agent, an adventure story set in an exotic location and an article about stress at work may all share the underlying belief that the way to make life bearable is to leave it behind from time to time, and go on a holiday.

When this hidden message is trite, stereotypical, a repeat of what you have encountered many a time, you have a forgettable story. The writing may be divine, you may enjoy it while you read, but it will soon get lost in the crowd of your memory.

Far worse is when the philosophy underlying the story violates your personal code. As an editor I need to keep a professional distance, and edit without judging the author’s system of beliefs. I’ve managed it for books of erotica that disgusted me (OK, OK, I’m a prude), but failed with two books. In both, the author gave her hero a personality I found abhorrent. In one case, he was a violent, arrogant, aggressive drug and alcohol abuser, and yet the hidden message of the book was that he was a great guy.

All right, what about the memorable story?

Have you read the great fantasy series by David Eddings? It consists of two lots of five books. The first five form The Belgariad, the second The Malloreon, but the ten books are a connected whole.

I find the first five books to be a joy to be repeated every few years. The last time I re-read Pawn of Prophecy, the first volume, I found ‘seeds’ that came to life in the fifth, and I had never noticed these before. And yet, The Malloreon does not hold the same fascination for me.

The reason is that the hidden message of The Belgariad is, in part, that an apparently ordinary person can become a superhero, and by identifying with Garion, I become more powerful, a stronger and better person. However, the second series lacks this message. Garion has become Belgarion, the Godslayer, and also, in order to keep up interest, the author has to skate closer and closer to the unbelievable.

This is why, to me, The Belgariad and the wonderful books of Dick Francis have something in common. They share a hidden message, one that inspires me.

So, I think a story you find memorable is one that resonates with your own belief system, and yet extends and challenges it. Naturally, this means that you can’t inspire everyone. People’s reactions to stories vary so much because our unspoken value systems vary so much.

You need to write for yourself, true. But also, you need to write for an audience: people whose philosophy is sufficiently like yours that they accept your message, but sufficiently different that your work will force them to think, to react, to be inspired to make changes.

When you achieve this, you have a memorable story.

Resurrected from Bobbing Around Volume 1 Number 3.


What my friends want you to know

Avaaz battling methane
Refugee webinar a success
Jan Sikes wins award
Unsyrupy love poems
Renewable energy wiki
Buddhist retreat WITH technology
Become a climate reality leader
Greenpeace helps Kiribati
Protect whales from assault

 

Avaaz battling methane

Dear Avaaz community,
meltingberg
This may be the most important email I’ve ever written to you.

Some time ago, a scientist went on his biannual tour of the Russian arctic ocean, checking for toxic plumes of methane gas bubbling up from the ocean. He’d previously seen hundreds of these plumes, about a meter wide each, emitting gas 50 times more damaging to our climate than carbon dioxide. This time, as he came across the first plume, he couldn’t believe it. It was a KILOMETER wide. A vast column of gas entering our atmosphere. He sailed on and found another a kilometer wide, and another, and another. Hundreds of them.

This could be what the experts warned us about. As the earth warms, it creates many “tipping points” that accelerate the warming out of control. Warming thaws the Arctic sea ice, destroying the giant white ‘mirror’ that reflects heat back into space, which massively heats up the ocean, and melts more ice, and so on. We spin out of control. In 2014 everything was off the charts — it was the hottest year in recorded history.

We CAN stop this, if we act very fast, and all together. And out of this extinction nightmare, we can pull one of the most inspiring futures for our children and grandchildren. A clean, green future in balance with the earth that gave birth to us.

We have 10 months left until the Paris Summit, the meeting that world leaders have decided will determine the fate of our efforts to fight climate change. It might seem like a long time — it’s not. We have 10 months to get our leaders to that meeting, give them a plan, and hold them accountable. It’s us vs. the oil companies, and fatalism.

We can win, we must, but we need to blast out of the gate in 2015 with pledges of just a few dollars/euros/pounds to support our work this year — we’ll only process the donations if we hit our goal. For the world we dream of, let’s make it happen.

Click to pledge what you can, Avaaz will process our donations only if we reach our goal of 10,000 new supporters.

PS. Last I checked, there were 37,766 pledges. I don’t know how many of those are new supporters though.


Refugee webinar a success

Last issue, I announced a webinar series I am involved with. The first presentation, by Dr Ida Kaplan, was wonderful, and a must-view. It will be accessible for 3 months for those who pay the (reduced and now very reasonable) fee, and we’ll be making a DVD for sale.

Three more webinars are planned.

Details are here and you can register here.

Content is aimed at psychological therapy providers, but Ida’s language, and the content of her talk, make this essential issue accessible to everyone.

The second session will be on Tuesday 10th March.


Jan Sikes wins award

convictrose
The Texas Association of Authors named The Convict and the Rose, by Author Jan Sikes, as the best Fiction/Biography book for 2014.

For the fourth year, readers have again determined the top title in each category. By any measure, the entries this year are of stellar quality. The books deliver to readers the experience of falling into the pages and climbing out with the greatest satisfaction.

Jan Sikes will be presented by the association at the State Capitol on April 11th, followed by an awards dinner and ceremony. As part of the DEAR Texas event on April 12th, she will be in at Malvern’s Books, 613 W. 29th in Austin, doing a reading and book signing. For a complete list of participating book stores, please visit DEARTexas.info.

Having previously lived in Coleman, Texas for twenty-five years, Jan currently resides in North Texas. You can find other published titles and music CDs that she releases in conjunction with each book at http://www.jansikes.com.


Unsyrupy love poems

cpulse
Valentine’s day is over, but these poems may appeal to you anyway.

Cherished Pulse: A Chapbook of Unsyrupy Love Poetry, by Carolyn Howard Johnson and Magdalena Ball

Celebration Series Fan Page on Facebook

Carolyn calls this unsyrupy love poetry. It is part of the Celebration Series she and Magadalena Ball offer poetry lovers in place of traditional cards–for about the same price. For MyShelf.com Willie Elliott says it is “snapshots of love by two gifted poets.”


Renewable energy wiki

The nonprofit organisation Embark has set up a wiki to encourage the rapid adoption of environmentally responsible energy projects. It is already a source of much useful information, and contact with likeminded people.
embark


Buddhist retreat WITH technology

We want to warmly invite you to our 1st in-person Multi Day Retreat — a week long immersive retreat set in the mountains of North Carolina from March 29th – April 4th. Over the past few years, we have practiced with a number of people and saw the potential to create a unique retreat container in line with our exploration here at Buddhist Geeks.

Both of us have practiced extensively in retreat contexts and will build on our past experience to create an innovative learning environment. On this retreat we’ll introduce several different forms of meditation including concentration, mindfulness, inquiry, heartfulness, and awareness. One thing we have discovered is the importance of social meditation and will include this in the afternoon sessions.

Another key dimension of Buddhist Geeks is the exploration and integration of technology into contemplative practice. Let’s be honest, if you’ve ever been on a traditional meditation retreat you know that while we’re asked not to use our gadgets at all many of us do. Instead of rejecting these technologies altogether we will have optional periods of conscious technology usage after lunch to turn up the microscope on how we use them and how they affect us.

We would love for you to join us!

With warmth,
Vincent and Emily Horn


Become a climate reality leader

Dear Bob,

In late November, world leaders will gather in Paris at the UN’s COP21 meeting to create the first-ever global agreement on greenhouse gas emissions. It’s truly a historic opportunity — and now it’s up to us to build the crucial planet-wide support necessary to ensure the strongest agreement possible. With only months to go, we have a lot of work ahead of us, and we need your help.


Greenpeace helps Kiribati

“Now we’re not the only fishermen in our ocean. Now, we cannot really survive…It will never get better.” — Karatek, a local fisherman from the island nation of Kiribati.

Dear Bob

My name is Lagi. I’m a proud Pacific Islander, and I’ve been the Pacific Oceans Campaigner with Greenpeace Australia for over a decade.

I’m writing to tell you about a game-changing campaign for our oceans and the people who rely on them.

Right now, villagers from the unique island nation of Kiribati are losing their livelihoods — even the ability to feed their families — thanks to monster fishing boats from Europe; commercial giants which have depleted their own fishing stocks and are now venturing to the far South Pacific to scoop up the last of highly-prized species like tuna.

It’s getting so bad on Kiribati that what was once a one or two hour fishing expedition in the morning now takes a full day, returning home with barely enough food to feed a family.

Fortunately, we have a plan to curb this reckless excess, but we need your help to make it happen. Click here to learn more and donate $45 to help launch this extraordinary campaign.
kirifish


Protect whales from assault

More than 100 pilot whales have died following a series of tragic mass strandings on New Zealand’s coast.

And for weeks, oil companies have been firing deafening shocks to the seafloor in the same area — potentially interfering with the whales’ ability to navigate.

Tell the New Zealand government to put all seismic testing on hold and launch an independent study.

Sign the petition.
whaledying


Reviews

Tales of the Symbiont Safety Patrol, by Samuel King
Ascending Spiral, reviewed by Paul Frampton
Ascending Spiral, reviewed by Theresa Crater
Tricked! The story of an internet scam, by Paul Frampton

 

Tales of the Symbiont Safety Patrol, by Samuel King

symbiont
This book is an interconnected series of short stories, combined into a coherent narrative that uses a fun way of presenting some important, serious questions:

What is a person? Do we have a person if an artificial intelligence has emotions, feelings, personality?

Is owning an artificial intelligence that is a person a form of slavery?

Is it ever allowable to inflict pain and suffering on someone, whether that person is the result of a birth or of a manufacturing process?

Below that, at a more subtle level, there are forever questions of morality: is violence justified in fighting evil, or does it make the defender evil too?

This sounds very serious, but I assure you, the story is not. It is a science fiction adventure meant to entertain, and it does.

Samuel King is an African-American, and a computer expert. Both these have clearly influenced his writing, resulting in a technically intriguing set of concepts, and a passionate call for compassion, decency, fairness in our own world.


Ascending Spiral, reviewed by Paul Frampton

A thought-provoking book which considers what is the meaning of life from the perspective of traveling back in time to observe many different reincarnations of essentially the same person. Each manifestation meets and prevails over evil and violence in their own way. The take-away message is that love and understanding can uniquely enable humanity successfully to survive.

The book’s narrative is not at all similar to any previous book I have read and I plan to re-read it to take in fully its several very important messages.

Highly recommended! 5-stars.

Paul Frampton very recently retired as Louis D. Rubin Jr., Distinguished Professor, 1996-2014, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Ascending Spiral, reviewed by Theresa Crater

First off, it’s a romance. Not just any romance. What if you had to chase the woman you love through several incarnations to woo her, win her, marry her, and at long last spend a lifetime with her? We recognize this woman through her eyes, through the gestures the hero uses to stroke her face, her response to that touch. But most of all we recognize her through that deep warm glow he feels when he sees her.

What keeps them apart? The flow of history. Human mistakes. First, he is killed defending her from Vikings, then she is raped and murdered by marauding English troops in Ireland. But I won’t tell you the rest. You’ll enjoy the romance in Dr. Bob Rich’s novel Ascending Spiral.

That’s not all, because we follow our hero into the spiritual realm after his (sometimes her) lifetimes. We are invited to think about the lessons we learn on earth. What is the purpose of each life? Why do we experience some of the things we do? Dr. Rich suggests we are learning from past mistakes or making up for wrongs we’ve committed. The character becomes a man, a woman, even a plant. (And he thought that would be peaceful!) As he progresses, he is able to help others in their journeys. At times, I wished the voices of the different incarnations were a bit more different, that they had very distinct ways of talking, but the similarities drives home the spiritual lesson that this is one soul.

Ever wonder how you ended up here on this earth at this precise moment, when the earth is up against the challenge of a toddler culture, as Dr. Rich calls it, and trying to grow into an adult culture? I enjoyed the focus on the ecology in this novel, the final call to action. This theme is tied into the original life of our hero, one that catches us by surprise. It’s a good surprise.

Theresa Crater brings ancient temples, lost civilizations and secret societies back to life in her visionary fiction. Her short stories explore ancient myth brought into the present day. Theresa has also published poetry and a baker’s dozen of literary criticism. Currently, she teaches writing and British lit in Denver.


Tricked! The story of an internet scam, by Paul Frampton

trickedcover
If something seems to be too good to be true, then it probably is. Paul, a top theoretical physicist, was lonely, and as many people do, he registered on a dating site. Someone, pretending to be a glamorous model, played him like a fish over a considerable time, and eventually hauled him in. He was arrested in Argentina with drugs in a suitcase he’d been tricked to have in his possession. So, an elderly man with a serious health complaint found himself in jail.

This could have wrecked his life, but instead his reaction was quite similar to that of Viktor Frankl (who was admittedly in a far worse situation, as a slave laborer of the Nazis). Both these men were determined to survive, to do their best in adverse circumstances, to grow from the experience, and to cope with the worst through the paradox of acceptance of reality while doing their best to change it.

The writing is very clear and vivid, with just the right amount of detail to bring scenes to life, and not a word more. This is a wise man, telling a horrific story of his life, with perfect calmness and acceptance. True wisdom is to admit your mistakes, learn from them — and have to compassion and decency to enable others to learn from them. I’ve seen online comments about Paul being “stupid.” Certain of his choices were, but that’s no reflection on him as a person. He was naive, trusting, lacked knowledge about the worst sides of human nature, but none of this reflects on his intelligence or character. He has used his suffering as a way of gaining wisdom, and doing a public service — and this is what he should be judged on.
paulframpton
I find it incredible that during nine months in prison, with a roomful of sometimes violent drug users, he was able to carry on his research, and wrote three scholarly papers that were accepted for publication. This is the resilience of the human spirit.
There has been quite a circus about Paul’s case, as a simple internet search will show. Obviously, part of his reason for writing this little book is to clear his name, to present his point of view. But also he writes, “What an unhappy business, that criminally cynical people will prey on the loneliness of others” (p 29). He wants to use his unwanted notoriety to protect others from a similar fate.
When my review copy arrived, I was partway through a crime novel that is vaunted as something you can’t put down. Well, I could. I found Paul’s true life account to be better written and more fascinating. Do yourself a favour and read it.


A bit of fun

A quiz

Up in the Northern Hemisphere where many of my readers live (poor things), winter is just ending. Don’t worry, summer is on the way, so you will need the knowledge I am about to impart.

In Australia, we’re still experiencing lots of heat, so for my local readers, the knowledge is still relevant.

OK, here is a quiz about fans — you know, those air-stirring devices that may be mounted on a ceiling, or be portable. Pick the best answers.

A fan:

  • cools the air in the room
  • warms the air in the room
  • leaves air temperature unchanged

The fan only does some good when its airflow hits a person.

  • True
  • False

There are some situations in which a fan is useless.

  • True
  • False

Why is this in the “fun” section? You’ll find out when you check out the answers.


About Bobbing Around

If you received a copy of Bobbing Around and don’t want a repeat, it’s simple. Drop me a line and I’ll drop you from my list.

You may know someone who would enjoy reading my rave. Bobbing Around is being archived at http://mudsmith.net/bobbing.html, or you can forward a copy to your friend. However, you are NOT ALLOWED to pass on parts of the newsletter, without express permission of the article’s author and the Editor (hey, the second one is me.)

If you are not a subscriber but want to be, email me. Subject should be ‘subscribe Bobbing Around’ (it will be if you click the link in this paragraph). In the body, please state your name, email address (get it right!), your country and something about yourself. I also want to know how you found your way to my newsletter. I hope we can become friends.

Contributions are welcome, although I reserve the right to decline anything, or to request changes before acceptance. Welcome are:

  • Announcements, but note that publication date is neither fixed nor guaranteed;
  • Brags of achievements that may be of general interest, for example publication of your book;
  • Poems or very short stories and essays that fit the philosophy and style of Bobbing Around;
  • Above all, responses to items in past issues. I will not reject or censor such comments, even if I disagree with them.

Submission Guidelines

It is a FALSE RUMOUR that you need to buy one of my books before your submission is accepted. Not that I cry when someone does so.

Above all, contributions should be brief. I may shorten them if necessary.

Content should be non-discriminatory, polite and relevant. Announcements should be 100 to 200 words, shorter if possible. Book reviews, essays and stories should be at the very most 500 words, poems up to 30 lines.

Author bios should be about 50 words, and if possible include a web address.

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About Dr Bob Rich

I am a professional grandfather. My main motivation is to transform society to create a sustainable world in which my grandchildren and their grandchildren in perpetuity can have a life, and a life worth living. This means reversing environmental idiocy that's now threatening us with extinction, and replacing culture of greed and conflict with one of compassion and cooperation.
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7 Responses to Bobbing Around Volume 14 Number 10

  1. Dear Dr. Bob, Your newsletter is always jam-packed full of interesting articles. Great that you put Janis Silverman’s meditation in it. She is good at that and so are you.

    It has been really cold and snow flurries a couple of days…icy conditions.the last two weeks. It is supposed to be warm next Thursday…in the 60’s. wWe will probably sweat!

    Never Give Up Joan Y. Edwards

    >

    Like

  2. Dr Bob Rich says:

    Thank you Joan. You’re always the first to comment. It’s how I know your instruction on how to have a delayed release works: I got your comment before notification of the newsletter!
    🙂
    Bob

    Like

  3. rijanjks says:

    Thank you for the shout out about the awesome award, Dr. Bob! I attribute part of it to the awesome editing job you did!

    Like

  4. Dr Bob Rich says:

    My pleasure, Jan.
    You’ve already been kind enough to praise my work on my editing page http://bobswriting.com/editing
    Hope you’ve got lots of writing to do yet!
    🙂
    Bob

    Like

    • Dr Bob Rich says:

      Thank you Jean. Looks like fun. The only problem is, the limerick I recently wrote defines ADHD, without using the term!

      There once was a young fellow named Bill
      Who really just couldn’t sit still.
      He went to a quack,
      who said, “we cannot have that,
      Here, quickly swallow this pill!”

      🙂
      Bob

      Like

  5. Pingback: Bobbing Around Volume 14 Number 11 | Bobbing Around

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